Beginner

  • 7 Ways to Contribute to OpenJDK

    A great many developers today are employed working with OpenJDK. If OpenJDK is the background source for your livelihood, you might want to contribute to future development of the OpenJDK.

    There are many ways you can do this. In this article I outline 7 possibilities, ranging from minimal work (because you’re too busy to do much, but you’d like to do something) to intensive work (participating on OpenJDK development is everything you want to do, it’s more than a hobby, you want to contribute to the maximum extent possible).

    Avatar
    Kevin Farnham
  • Getting Started with FXGL Game Development

    FXGL is a JavaFX Game Library Engine for Java and Kotlin, created by Almas Baimagambetov.

    In this article, you’ll read what FXGL is, what it is good for, what its dependencies are, as well as a complete scenario with a video and code snippets to set up your first FXGL scenario from scratch.

    Avatar
    Frank Delporte
  • Getting Started with Payara Server

    In this article, you’re presented with four short videos that will take you step-by-step through installing, writing, and deploying an application to Payara Server, even if you’ve never used the application server before.

    Visit the Payara Getting Started page for further resources on getting started, including: Configuring, Adding a data source, Adding functionality, monitoring, security auditing, Creating a Restful Web Service, Logging, Testing Apps, etc.

    Jadon Ortlepp
    Jadon Ortlepp
  • OpenJDK, JDKs and Every Java Acronym in Between

    The Java SE landscape is strewn with acronyms that it has picked up over the last 25 years. Sometimes those acronyms even mean multiple things.

    This post attempts to explain them all in terms of two main groupings: OpenJDK and Java Development Kits

    Avatar
    Helen Scott
  • The Reason Java Was Invented

    With the invention of Java, James Gosling and friends created a system whereby any code could be run on any machine or operating system that supports a JVM.

    All the coding that lets Java (or any other language that can produce Java bytecode) run anywhere is the fact that the JVM itself translates the bytecode into what’s needed for whatever operating system or hardware you’re running on.

    Avatar
    Kevin Farnham
  • New to IntelliJ IDEA? Me Too!

    Until recently, I last wrote Java in anger in 2002. IntelliJ IDEA had just been released; it wasn’t remotely on my radar. I honestly can’t remember what IDE we were using back then, but it certainly was a very long way to the fully featured IDE that JetBrains produce today.

    Here’s my personal experience of using IntelliJ IDEA for the first time.

    Avatar
    Helen Scott
  • Learning Java as a First Language

    I started programming in Java way back in 1999. I had just started a job as the director of web development at a small startup called eDeploy.com.

    Rather than focusing on my experience, I thought it’d be fun to write a post that provides people with no programming experience how to become Java developers.

    Hopefully, this short and sweet list of learning resources inspires you to try Java. It’s a great language, that can do many things. Write once, run anywhere!

    Avatar
    Matt Raible
  • Running Single-File Java Source Code Without Compiling (Part 2)

    Let’s continue from part 1 of this series, by looking at JEP 330, Launch Single-File Source-Code Programs, which is one of the new features introduced in the OpenJDK 11 release. This feature allows you to execute a Java source code file directly using the java interpreter.

    The source code is compiled in memory and then executed by the interpreter, without producing a .class file on disk.

    However, this feature is limited to code that resides in a single source file. You cannot add additional source files to be compiled in the same run.

    Avatar
    Mohamed Taman
  • Why the JVM Is a Brilliant Platform for New Programming Languages

    The brilliance of the Java Virtual Machine is that it is itself an operating system.

    In other words, if you use the JVM as your base platform, you don’t have to worry about numerous “if” statements related to the specifics of hardware and operating systems.

    The JVM takes care of all of that for you. Whatever you write, it’s going to run perfectly on any operating system and hardware that supports the Java Virtual Machine.

    Avatar
    Kevin Farnham
  • Running Single-File Java Source Code Without Compiling (Part 1)

    Instead of starting up the JVM, loading a class and executing the code, you can run single Java source files.

    This feature is particularly useful for someone new to the language who wants to try out simple programs, you get a great beginner’s learning toolset.

    Professionals can also make use of these tools to explore new language changes or to try out an unknown API.

    Avatar
    Mohamed Taman

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