Java

  • Building OpenJDK from GitHub Sources on 64-bit Raspberry Pi

    The OpenJDK sources are now fully available and developed on GitHub as a result of Project Skara. Thanks to a lot of work done by the community, the full Java development flow has been migrated to GitHub while keeping the repository history. This process has been described on the GitHub blog.

    This also means we are now able to build OpenJDK ourselves from the latest sources, very easily, on any device where we want to use the latest not-yet-released-version.

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    Frank Delporte
  • Electronics & Micronaut Velocity with Raspberry Pi

    In this article we present you with another great example of Java on Raspberry Pi. It shows how to create a Micronaut Velocity demo using an 8×8 LED matrix display.

    Both on hardware as software level, you have different possible approaches, but the result is the same… a fun project to learn new software technologies and getting introduced into electronics.

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    Frank Delporte
  • Electronics & Quarkus Qute on Raspberry Pi

    The “Hello World” version of electronics programming is a blinking LED. But, in this post, we will go a few steps further and control 8 LEDs inside a number display.

    Igor De Souza, Dublin based Principal Big Data Consultant at Oracle, set up an interesting experiment in which he combines a LED number display with the Raspberry Pi and Quarkus.

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    Frank Delporte
  • Learning Java as a First Language

    I started programming in Java way back in 1999. I had just started a job as the director of web development at a small startup called eDeploy.com.

    Rather than focusing on my experience, I thought it’d be fun to write a post that provides people with no programming experience how to become Java developers.

    Hopefully, this short and sweet list of learning resources inspires you to try Java. It’s a great language, that can do many things. Write once, run anywhere!

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    Matt Raible
  • Spectacular Java Projects on the Raspberry Pi

    Thanks to Twitter and LinkedIn, I’ve been in touch with several developers who are doing cool Java stuff on the Raspberry Pi.

    Here I want to share those projects with you, as they can be an inspiration for all of us to get started with Java development on the Raspberry Pi!

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    Frank Delporte
  • Azul Zulu OpenJDK 15 on Raspberry Pi

    With Azul Zulu OpenJDK 15, for this post I did some experiments with Java 15, reusing the Ubuntu 64bit SD card which was also used for my earlier post “Startup Speed of Spring and Quarkus JARs on the Raspberry Pi”.

    Do you need to switch from OpenJDK 11 to 15? No, not really, based on these results. But each new version has bug and security fixes, new features, and generic improvements!

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    Frank Delporte
  • Startup Speed of Spring and Quarkus JARs on the Raspberry Pi

    For my book “Getting Started with Java on Raspberry Pi”, an example was described to store sensors and measurements in an H2-database through REST APIs with a Spring application on the Raspberry Pi.

    The application takes some time to start on a Raspberry Pi, and Adam Bien who does the airhacks.fm podcast, asked me if I could compare this to a similar Quarkus application, which resulted in some nice results.

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    Frank Delporte
  • What’s New in Java 15?

    Now that Java 15 has been released, let’s take a look at what’s new!

    Here on foojay, the fixes that went into the release are listed, giving you a unique and readable changelog in helpful categories, with the invitation for you to vote on those that are most relevant to you.

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    Geertjan Wielenga
  • What is JVM Bytecode?

    Everyone who programs in Java, or any of the other languages built on top of the Java Virtual Machine (Scala, Closure, Kotlin, Groovy, Nashorn, Jython, JRuby, et al.) is familiar with the term “bytecode.”

    But how many of us understand what JDK bytecode actually is?

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    Kevin Farnham
  • What’s New in JavaFX 15?

    A couple of weeks ago, JavaFX version 15 was released.

    These are some of the highlights we’ve selected for you to understand its scope.

    – JavaFX now has 3D support for the newer Intel graphics drivers on Linux,

    – Support for e-paper displays on i.MX6 devices was added,

    – FX scripting support was enhanced.

    Avatar
    Bruno Lowagie
  • Why the JVM Is a Brilliant Platform for New Programming Languages

    The brilliance of the Java Virtual Machine is that it is itself an operating system.

    In other words, if you use the JVM as your base platform, you don’t have to worry about numerous “if” statements related to the specifics of hardware and operating systems.

    The JVM takes care of all of that for you. Whatever you write, it’s going to run perfectly on any operating system and hardware that supports the Java Virtual Machine.

    Avatar
    Kevin Farnham

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