Author: Simon Ritter

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Simon Ritter

Deputy CTO at Azul Systems

  • JDK 15 Hidden Classes

    Unlike sealed classes, hidden classes (JEP 371) are a JVM rather than a language-level feature. One of the specific goals of this feature is not to make any changes to the Java language.

    A hidden class is not discoverable by the JVM during bytecode linkage, nor by programs making explicit use of class loaders. Hidden classes can be unloaded independently of the class that uses them. This allows them to be garbage collected in the usual way since there is no longer any references to them.

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    Simon Ritter
  • JDK 15 Sealed Classes

    The most significant new feature in JDK 15, and the only change to the language, is the introduction of sealed classes as a preview feature.

    Sealed classes (explained in detail in JEP 360) provide a fine-grained mechanism that allows a developer to restrict which other classes or interfaces may extend them. You can think of final classes as the ultimate sealed class since no other classes can extend them.

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    Simon Ritter
  • Highlights of Changes to the Core Java Platform

    February 12th, 1996. This is a significant date for me personally since it was the day I started work at Sun Microsystems as a Solaris Systems Engineer. It was also two weeks and six days after the release of the Java Development Kit (JDK 1.0).

    Of course, the origins of Java go further back than this; James Gosling and others started work on a new programming language in 1991, and it was the May 23rd 1995 when Java was officially announced to the world.

    As a language, Java has evolved over the last 25 years in a way that has, with few exceptions, provided excellent backwards compatibility.

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    Simon Ritter
  • JDK14: New Features and Enhancements

    Well, another six months have passed, and we have another release of Java, this one pretty packed with exciting new features. It is, therefore, time for another blog post trying to list everything new in JDK 14.

    In total, there are a very impressive 16 JDK Enhancement Proposals (JEPs) and 69 new API elements.

    Let’s start with the more significant items that introduce changes to the Java language syntax.

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    Simon Ritter

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