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System Logger

February 18, 2022

December was not a good time for Java developers and even less for Ops. The former had to repackage their apps with a fixed Log4J's version, and the latter had to redeploy them - several times. Yet, every cloud has a silver lining. In my case, I learned about System.Logger.

In short, System.Logger is a façade over your logging engine. Instead of using, say, SFL4J's API and the wanted implementation, you'd use System.Logger instead of SLF4J. It's available since Java 9, and it's a bummer that I learned about it only recently.

System.Logger API

The API is a bit different than other logging APIs: it avoids different logging methods such as debug(), info() in favor of a single log() one where you pass a logging Level parameter.

If you don't provide any corresponding implementation on the classpath, System.Logger defaults to JUL.

public class LoggerExample {

  private static final System.Logger LOGGER = System.getLogger("c.f.b.DefaultLogger"); // 1

  public static void main(String[] args) {
      LOGGER.log(DEBUG, "A debug message");
      LOGGER.log(INFO, "Hello world!");
  }
}
  1. Get the logger

Running the above snippet outputs the following:

Dec 24, 2021 10:38:15 AM c.f.b.DefaultLogger main
INFO: Hello world!

Compatible implementations

Most applications currently use Log4J2 or SLF4J. Both provide a compatible System.Logger implementation.

For Log4J, we need to add two dependencies:

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.apache.logging.log4j</groupId>
        <artifactId>log4j-core</artifactId>            <!-- 1 -->
        <version>2.17.0</version>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.apache.logging.log4j</groupId>    <!-- 2 -->
        <artifactId>log4j-jpl</artifactId>
        <version>2.17.0</version>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>
  1. Log4J implementation
  2. Bridge from System.Logger to Log4J

The same logging snippet as above now outputs the following:

11:00:07.373 [main] INFO  c.f.b.DefaultLogger - Hello world!

To use SLF4J instead, use the following dependencies:

<dependencies>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
        <artifactId>slf4j-simple</artifactId>               <!-- 1 -->
        <version>2.0.0-alpha5</version>
    </dependency>
    <dependency>
        <groupId>org.slf4j</groupId>
        <artifactId>slf4j-jdk-platform-logging</artifactId> <!-- 2 -->
        <version>2.0.0-alpha5</version>
    </dependency>
</dependencies>
  1. Basic SLF4J implementation. Any other implementation will do, e.g. Logback
  2. Bridge from System.Logger to Log4J

The snippet outputs:

[main] INFO c.f.b.DefaultLogger - Hello world!

Your own System.Logger implementation

System.Logger relies on Java's ServiceLoader mechanism. Both log4j-jpl and slf4j-jdk-platform-logging contain a META-INF/services/java.lang.System$LoggerFinder file that points to a LoggerFinder implementation.

We can create our own based on System.out for educational purposes.
The first step is to implement the logger itself.

public class ConsoleLogger implements System.Logger {

    private final String name;

    public ConsoleLogger(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    @Override
    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean isLoggable(Level level) {
        return level.getSeverity() >= Level.INFO.getSeverity();
    }

    @Override
    public void log(Level level, ResourceBundle bundle, String msg, Throwable thrown) {
        if (isLoggable(level)) {
            System.out.println(msg);
            thrown.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    @Override
    public void log(Level level, ResourceBundle bundle, String format, Object... params) {
        if (isLoggable(level)) {
            System.out.println(MessageFormat.format(format, params));
        }
    }
}

Then, we need to code the System.LoggerFinder:

public class ConsoleLoggerFinder extends System.LoggerFinder {

    private static final Map<String, ConsoleLogger> LOGGERS = new HashMap<>(); // 1

    @Override
    public System.Logger getLogger(String name, Module module) {
        return LOGGERS.computeIfAbsent(name, ConsoleLogger::new);              // 2
    }
}
  1. Keep a map of all existing loggers
  2. Create a logger if it doesn't already exist and store it

Finally, we create a service file:

ch.frankel.blog.ConsoleLoggerFinder

And now, running the same code snippet outputs:

Hello world!

Conclusion

While the API is more limited than other more established logging APIs, System.Logger is a great idea. It offers a façade that's part of the JDK. Thus, it avoids using a third-party façade that needs to wire calls to another unrelated implementation, e.g. SLF4J to Log4J2.

For this reason, I think I'll be trying System.Logger if only to get some hands-on experience.

The complete source code for this post can be found in Maven format there.

To go further:

Originally published at A Java Geek on February 13th, 2022

Topics:

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Author(s)

  • Nicolas Frankel

    Nicolas is a developer advocate with 15+ years experience consulting for many different customers, in a wide range of contexts (such as telecoms, banking, insurances, large retail and public sector). ... Learn more

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