Tools

  • Live Templates in IntelliJ IDEA

    When I first came across the notion of Live Templates, I couldn’t figure out what was ‘live’ about them. Did they need feeding or something?

    It seems to be an industry-standard term, so I’m no longer devoting much energy to this quandary, but if you were wondering the same, you’re not alone.

    Avatar
    Helen Scott
  • Fixing Vulnerabilities in Maven Projects

    Maven is still the most used build system in the Java ecosystem. According to the JVM report 2020, Maven is the number one build tool in the ecosystem with two-thirds of the share.

    Therefore, it is important to now how Maven works. For instance, if you find vulnerabilities in your Maven project using Snyk, how can you fix them?

    Avatar
    Brian Vermeer
  • Why You Should Join EclipseCon Community Day

    EclipseCon Community Day is on Monday, October 19 14:00 to 18:00 CET (the day before the start of the main EclipseCon conference).

    Community Day at EclipseCon has always been a great event for Eclipse working groups and project teams. This year both EclipseCon and Community Day is virtual and free. Space for Community Day is limited, so please register and save your spot soon.

    Avatar
    Reza Rahman
  • New to IntelliJ IDEA? Me Too!

    Until recently, I last wrote Java in anger in 2002. IntelliJ IDEA had just been released; it wasn’t remotely on my radar. I honestly can’t remember what IDE we were using back then, but it certainly was a very long way to the fully featured IDE that JetBrains produce today.

    Here’s my personal experience of using IntelliJ IDEA for the first time.

    Avatar
    Helen Scott
  • Introducing JmFrX: A Bridge From JMX to Java Flight Recorder

    JmFrX is a small utility which allows you to capture JMX data with Java Flight Recorder.

    In this blog post I’m going to explain how to use JmFrX for recording JMX data in your applications, point out some interesting JmFrX implemention details, and lastly will discuss some potential steps for future development of the tool.

    Avatar
    Gunnar Morling
  • Monitoring REST APIs with Custom Java Flight Recorder Events

    The Java Flight Recorder (JFR) is an invaluable tool for gaining deep insights into the performance characteristics of Java applications.

    In this blog post, we’re going to explore how custom, application-specific JFR events can be used to monitor a REST API, allowing to track request counts, identify long-running requests, and more.

    Avatar
    Gunnar Morling
  • A Closer Look at JFR Streaming

    Since JDK 14, there is a new kid on the block – Java Flight Recorder streaming, which enables developers to subscribe to JFR data.

    It is a feature allowing a developer to subscribe to select JFR data and to decide what to do with that data in the host process. JFR events can also be consumed from a separate process by pointing to the file repo of a separate JVM process – the mechanism is the same.

    Avatar
    Marcus Hirt

Subscribe to foojay updates:

https://foojay.io/feed/
Copied to the clipboard